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Hillary Is Not Ahead By 3 Million Votes And That’s Just Math

Hillary Is Not Ahead By 3 Million Votes And That’s Just Math

In the current primary race, we keep hearing that Hillary Clinton is ahead by 3 million votes. In fact, it’s all we hear at events and from the corporate media – that she has the lead in the popular vote and it’s a done deal. The number helps to legitimize Clinton’s campaign in the face of Sanders’ populist message. Sanders may complain about how the system is rigged and speculate that Superdelegates aren’t more loyal to their constituency, but Clinton has always been able to point out that she has the power of the popular vote.

 

In the current primary race, we keep hearing that Hillary Clinton is ahead by 3 million votes. In fact, it’s all we hear at events and from the corporate media – that she has the lead in the popular vote and it’s a done deal. The number helps to legitimize Clinton’s campaign in the face of Sanders’ populist message. Sanders may complain about how the system is rigged and speculate that Superdelegates aren’t more loyal to their constituency, but Clinton has always been able to point out that she has the power of the popular vote.

In a recent article posted to the New York Daily News, by activist and writer Shaun King made an interesting point that could change the way we view the entire Democratic primary race. What King revealed in his groundbreaking article is that the 3 million vote advantage Clinton holds is a lie.

According to King, primary races don’t just include voters going out and casting a ballot. Instead, many states hold caucuses in which a group of representatives vouches for their candidate. The candidate with the most representatives in the room wins in that district, and the candidate who wins the most districts is the winner of the state.

What happens in these cases is that individual votes are not gathered, therefore no votes go to the winning candidate.

Bernie Sanders has tended to win most caucusing states. Though Sanders may take more than 70 percent of the caucus vote, these numbers don’t translate to individual votes — they add nothing to the overall count. So, states with millions of Sanders supporters are not counted among the millions in competition with Clinton’s big numbers as a result of this system.

Let’s agree that this is not about Bernie or Hillary or who’s side I’m on. Let’s agree that this is about simple facts and the truth. We don’t need to get into who would make the better president or who’s more qualified; who should step down because they’re losing or are in the middle of an email scandal or because you simply don’t like them. Let’s worry more about being lied to – or at the very least misled – by a party that’s supposed to be representing us, the voter. The truth is it’s just a small portion of the population making up the demographic.

To be clear, Clinton is still leading and has a significant advantage. But, as King points out, this race will more than likely come down to the Superdelegate vote. For that vote to be based on an incorrect score of national voters would be ignoring the reality of the Democratic demographic. Superdelegates need to weigh their decisions carefully, and we need to begin to see this race for what it is.

As King writes:

Hillary Clinton needs 615 pledged delegates to cross the threshold she needs. That’s a bit more than 65% of the delegates, and she is not predicted to win even one of the remaining states by that margin. In other words, after the final primaries are held in June, Hillary Clinton will not have won enough delegates to be the nominee.

In that case, the Superdelegates will have to decide.

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King goes on:

… we really don’t know the vote difference between Clinton and Sanders.

The Clinton campaign knows this. Their friends in the media know this, but they continue to allow the campaign to tout that 3 million number even though they know full well that it’s not accurate. The Democratic primaries and caucuses simply don’t have accurate popular vote totals.

Hillary supporters like to flaunt that she’s earned the delegates because she won certain states or won the popular vote. King calls that “a farce.”

In closing, here’s what King says, and this is a bit disturbing. And it should disturb you whether you support Clinton, Sanders, or even Trump. It should trouble you that this is happening in a democracy:

Right now, in spite of the shocking success of Bernie’s campaign, 93% of superdelegates who have made their votes clear are backing Clinton. Again, the hype about them supporting Clinton because of the popular vote is a lie.

If 93% of them were supporting Bernie right now, in addition to those already in his camp, Bernie would have 2,019 delegates and Hillary would have 1,807.

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